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Dunham Massey

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  • dunhammassey@nationaltrust.org.uk
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Altrincham, Manchester,
Cheshire, WA14 4SJ

0161 9411025

0161 929 7508


Listed By
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2018-01-09 06:14:45

Opening Days and Hours
Dates/days/times open:

11 Feb - 5 Nov 2017

Garden: daily 10.30am-5pm (last entry at 4.30pm)

House: Sat - Wed 11am-5pm (last entry at 4pm), by guided tour only until Wed 22 March.

Cafe and Shop: daily, 10am-5pm.

Stables Restaurant: daily, 10am-4pm.

Park: daily, 8am-8pm.

Parties/Coaches: No
Group Appointment: No
House Open for Viewing: Yes

Open by guided tour until Wed 22 March, 11am-3.30pm.

From 25 March House: Sat - Wed 11am-5pm (last entry at 4pm).

National Garden Scheme days: No
Best Times of Year to Visit:

May & June
June & July
August - October

To see:

Bog Garden
Late flowering Azaleas (Denny Platt Collection)
Hydrangea Collection, Rose

Admission Prices

House & Garden Adult: £13.50, Child: £6.75, Family £33.75
Garden Adult: £8.60, Child: £4.30, Family: £21.60
Car Park Car: 6.00, Motorbike: £1.50

Onsite Facilities
Parking: No
Shop: No
Teas: No
Dogs Allowed: No
Lavatories: No
Plants for Sale: No
Refreshment: No
On Lead only: No
Disabled Access: No
Lunches: No
Picnics: No
Special Events: No
Other Facilities & Comments:

Restaurant and shop open year round. Designated picnic area near car park. Picnics permitted in garden but not in deer park. No dogs in the garden. Dogs on lead in deer park.

Garden Features & Events

Rose Garden, Elizabethan Mount, Victorian Bark House, 18th Century Orangery, Pump House and Edwardian Parterre.

Dunham's Lost Years - meet the rebellious 7th Earl and his new wife, London celebrity Catharine Cox. See their story of love, status and scandal played out throughout the house and discover how they altered the course of Dunham's history forever.

English Heritage/Visit Scotland Garden Grade:
National Collection:
Nearby Cambridgeshire Hotels, Facilities & Amenities

Hotels & Accommodation:

Quality Hotel, Langham Road, Bowden, Altrincham


The Stables Restaurant, Dunham Massey

Inns & Pubs:

Spread Eagle Hotel, Lymm, Cheshire

Villages / Towns / Sightseeing:

Altrincham (Metro tram to Manchester)
Quarry Bank Mill
Manchester United museum
Tatton Park
Jodrell Bank

Description of Garden

Surrounding the 18th-century house, the garden at Dunham Massey is a great plantsman's garden with interesting historic features of note including an Orangery, Pump House, Victorian Bark House and the remains of an Elizabethan Mount.

Acid conditions and a varied site provide for a wide range of unusual shade- and moisture-loving plants including Giant Chinese Lilies, Himalayan Blue Poppies and rare late-flowering azaleas, all set amongst manicured lawns, mixed borders and cool woodland. Well worth visiting in spring for the drifts of bluebells in the shady woods, in summer for the Edwardian parterre with its glorious formal bedding or in autumn for the spectacular border of hydrangeas containing over 60 varieties.

History Of Garden

The moat is first mentioned in 1411 but is probably much older and the Mount formed part of the garden created by 'Old' Sir George Booth at the start of the 17th century. The 2nd Earl of Warrington removed the walled enclosures and created an enormous park which also included terraces, parterres, and two productive gardens. The 5th Earl of Stamford was responsible for the flowing lawns and more naturalistic planting seen today. He also planted purple beech in the early 1790's, two specimens of which still survive near the Orangery. His son, Lord Grey of Groby, was an enthusiastic planter and collected many trees and plants of all kinds, as did the 7th Earl, who, after he succeeded in 1845, doubled the expenditure on the gardens.

Standards began to slip by the end of the century but the 9th Earl took a keen interest in the gardens and laid out a parterre by the north front and a rose garden. After WWII the garden lost many of its features, (the workforce diminishing from 10 to 2) and it was not until the National Trust took it over with a generous bequest from the 10th and last Earl of Stamford in 1976 that restoration began, masterminded by John Sales, its Head of Gardens, and a dedicated team of five gardeners.