• Mail us :


Killerton House

Gardens-Guide.com is the premiere open gardens directory in Britain today.

  • Devon
  • 01392-881345
  • killerton@nationaltrust.org.uk
  • Home
  • Garden's Finder
  • Garden's Detail

Broadclyst, Exeter,
Devon, EX5 3LE




Listed By
User Image

2018-01-17 03:57:31

Opening Days and Hours
Dates/days/times open:

Please check with garden owners or their website to confirm current dates open
Garden / Park: All year, 10:30 - 7, Sun - Sat
Last admission 30mins before closing

Parties/Coaches: Yes
Group Appointment: Yes
House Open for Viewing: Yes

16th Feb - 8th Mar; daily; 11am - 3pm
9th Mar - 3rd Nov; daily; 11am - 5pm
23rd Nov - 31st Dec; daily; 11am - 4pm

National Garden Scheme days: Yes
Best Times of Year to Visit:

Spring and early Summer

To see:

Bulbs, Rhododendrons and Azaleas.

Admission Prices

Gift Aid Admission (Standard Admission prices in brackets)
House, garden and park: adult £9.60 (£8.70), child £4.80 (£4.35), family £24.20 (£22), family (1 adult and 3 children) £15 (£13.60).
Park only: adult £3 (£2.70), child £1.50 (£1.35).
Part property (winter rate when house closed): adult £7 (£6.35), child £3.50 (£3.15).
Reduced rate when arriving by bicycle or public transport.

Onsite Facilities
Parking: Yes
Shop: Yes
Teas: Yes
Dogs Allowed: No
Lavatories: Yes
Plants for Sale: Yes
Refreshment: Yes
On Lead only: No
Disabled Access: Yes
Lunches: Yes
Picnics: Yes
Special Events: Yes
Other Facilities & Comments:

Dogs on lead in parkland only. No access for disabled to first floor of house. Specially adapted buggies (with drivers) give less able visitors the chance to view the sloped gardens. Many special garden events - see own website. Restaurant open on occasion in Dec, Jan & Feb.

Garden Features & Events

Ice House, Rock garden, Chapel. Fine 18th-century house with costume collection, hillside garden and estate; home to the 'Paulise de Bush' costume collection, with over 9,000 outfits; delightful hillside garden featuring rhododendrons, magnolias, and rare trees; stunning parkland walks all year round; home-cooked, good quality regional food in tea-room and restaurant; plant centre selling produce grown in peat-free compost.

English Heritage/Visit Scotland Garden Grade:
National Collection:
Nearby Cambridgeshire Hotels, Facilities & Amenities

Hotels & Accommodation:

Many in Exeter


Jack in the Green, Rockbeare

Inns & Pubs:

Five Bells, Clyst Hydon Jack in the Green, Rockbeare Red Lion, Broadclyst

Villages / Towns / Sightseeing:

Exeter Dartmoor

Description of Garden

A beautiful hillside garden for all seasons. In early spring, the grass slopes are successively carpeted with spring bulbs and wild flowers, whilst magnolia, crimson and pink rhododendron and sweetly scented azalea flower above. The herbaceous and tender borders are at their best in summer and in autumn the specimen trees flame into colour. Even in winter, there is always something to see.

Killerton is a plantsman's paradise, with rare trees and shrubs from around the world, many of them the first of their kind to be planted in this country. Other special features of the garden include the thatched Bear's Hut, which once housed a Canadian black bear, a rock garden and the ice house, used in Victorian times for storing ice cut from ponds on the estate.

History Of Garden

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland started the collection of trees at Killerton when he planned a landscape park to surround the new house he had built in the 1770s. His gardener and land steward was John Veitch who developed into an exceptional landscaper. The Veitch family, who started a nursery at nearby Budlake, were amongst the first to send plant hunters out to gather new species from the wild. The association between the Aclands and Veitchs, whereby new plants were continually added to the collection at Killerton, was maintained until 1939 (with the exception of a period of 30 years after Sir Thomas's death). A giant sequoia from the west coast of America, which still stands at Killerton, was grown from seed sent back by Veitch's collector William Lobb in the 1850s.